Extended Practices: Systems and Seriality

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Diane Borsato

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Tom Friedman | At Luhring Augustine Gallery  | At Saatchi Gallery | At Gagosian gallery | At Stephen Friedman gallery

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Tom Friedman
Untitled, 1990
Bubble gum
Approximately 1,500 pieces of chewed bubble gum molded into a sphere and displayed at head height in a corner, hanging by its own stickiness

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Georgia Grieve | Ikea Drawings

Allanah Volkes | Google Drawings  | UFC Drawings | More

Jason Polan | Every Person In New York (blog) (book)

Jenny Odell
http://www.jennyodell.com/projects.html

Nicolas Feltron
For those of you obsessed with data visualization created an app:

KATE BINGAMAN BURT

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Listen to an new interview with illustrator and author, Kate Bingaman Burt. Remember? We saw her work at the beginning of the term—she is the artist that draws everything she purchases.

Junk Mail into Art
Another excellent automated directive.

Christoph NiemannAbstract Sunday • He is also featured on the Netflix show, Abstract

Martin Brief | A Brief History of Time | Amazon God | almost any of the projects on his site

Christian Bok | Eunoia | web iteration | Wikipedia entry

On Kawara | Twitter |

 

 

 

 

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Roger Newton: The DIY Lens Guy

One artist that really interested me is Roger Newton. He is a photographer who creates large abstract images and whose determination to create nonrepresentational work has lead him to create his own camera, lenses and film. He originally became interested in photography when he was attending art school in New York during the 1980s. It was during this time he discovered the pinhole camera and was at once drawn to the blurry and unpredictability of the images created. He would eventually go on to make numerous pinhole cameras eventually branching out to create lenses made of mineral oil, corn syrup, water, glycerin, or other refracting liquids. At one point taking a break from his photographic practice in order to research and develop the kind of black and white film he desired (Margarett, 2001). In his artist statement Newton goes to say that, “by designing and fabricating my own lenses I can control the quality of the light collected, the size and shape of the image field, and the colors in the scene. This allows me to work more directly with fundamental problems in the processes of seeing and perception, and ultimately the ontological problems of the thing and or scene depicted” (Foundation for Contemporary Arts, n.d.). He fabricates his photographs by layering up various liquid substances to create a lens. The lens purposely made to “exists out of the normal range of our visual faculties”. To reject standard photographic imaging systems and photography as a medium of representationalism. Instead focusing on the optical experience of looking.

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It is Newtons rejection of photo-representalism and focus on the methods of imaging making that interests me when looking at my own idea for the final project. The reason I say this is because for this project I will be continuing my role as art researcher, and focusing on unearthing photographic practices; removing all subjective interpretations and limiting definitions. Instead focusing on the facts, presently that means understanding photography as the use and manipulation of light to maintain an image. An image which as author and curator Lyle Rexler points out isn’t always based on realism (Rexer, 2013) . With this definition in mind I intend to conduct several experiments ones which like Newton’s will circulate around methods of light manipulation to produce what can be describe for all intensive purposed as undisclosed images. Always keeping in mind my definition of photography and excluding anything from this experiment which would distract or hinder it. A second reason I am interested in Newtons work is that his use of liquids to create lenses has given me another possibility to consider in my own experimentation and manipulation of light for this project. Other methods/ elements I’m looking at include (but not limited to); types of light sources, the chemical composition of types of light and things that give off light, Photographic paper manipulation, reflection/ refraction, filtered light, aperture, shutter speed/ exposure, light wave lengths, energy, Inference of light.

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References

Foundation for Contemporary Arts. (n.d.). Roger Newton. Retrieved from Foundation for   the Contemporary arts web site:       http://www.foundationforcontemporaryarts.org/recipients/roger-newton

Margarett, L. (2001, June 8). Photography Review; Reinventing the lens for large   abstraction. The New York Times.

Rexer, L. (2013). The Edge of Vision: The Rise of Abstraction in Photography. New York:   Apature.

Additional Sources

https://collectordaily.com/the-edge-of-vision-abstraction-in-contemporary-photography-aperture/

http://www.lpwalliance.com/publication/43/

http://www.photoeye.com/BookteaseLight/bookteaselight.cfm?catalog=TR222&image=1

Micheal Paul Smith

About The Artist:

Micheal Paul Smith is an artist whose work concerns small toys in the place of real life objects, therefore, making realistic scenes through the use of plastic toys and thoughtful placement. He then photographs these scenes in a way that makes them look very convincing. He makes these photographs by creating a 1:24 scale ratio to recreate everyday scenes from the mid 20th century to -mid 60s America.

How did it begin?

Smith started off with an interest in making scale models of objects as well as an interest in photography. This combination later grew into something magical. He used his sculptural skills and photography skills to create convincing photographs of olden day scenes. Smith wanted to recreate the town in which he grew up in which was a town in America in the 20th century to mid 60s. His work is not an exact replica of the town he grew up in but it does what he wants it to do and that is to create the feeling of the town he grew up in and bring back his childhood memories.

How is it made?

The buildings are constructed of resin-coated paper, styrene plastic, and basswood, plus numerous found objects. The vehicles are from Michael’s collection of 300+ commercially produced, diecast models.

These photographs were all made through the use of placement. No Photoshop was used in these images; they’re all composed in the camera. He refers to it as  the oldest trick in the special effects book: lining up a model with an appropriate background, then photographing it.

How does his work relate to my work?

I am interested in a similar idea that Smith uses within his work. For my final project I am interested in taking recognizable items/objects, constructing a sculpture and then using photography to make the objects look like much more then they really are. Through photography I will change the reality of the object so it is seen as something different then what it is seen as in person. This relates to Smith’s work because he builds structures and then uses photography to change the structure he built into realistic photographs of a fictional town.

Progress photos vs final photos :

 

His Links:

https://vimeo.com/116577464

http://blog.flickr.net/en/2013/10/04/crafting-scenes-of-iconic-americana/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/24796741@N05/

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/14/automobiles/collectibles/14SCALE.html

http://hooniverse.com/2010/03/10/mps-interview-pt1/

 

Matthew Brandt

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Matthew Brandt is an American artist, born in Los Angeles, California in 1982; and is known for creating large-scale photographs through “labour-intensive processes” that elicit the origins of 19th century photography. The question Brandt most often refers to in his art is the questions of “What is a photograph?” A question we are very familiar with from our class work. Brandt calls his approach, “A little bit messy and experimental”, as he believes that in order to create distinctive images, he must first separate his work from the rest. His approach often incorporates the use of found materials from the locations in which he captures his images to further represent what he sees in front of him. This is evident in his series “Lakes and Reservoirs” (2011). Experimentation is a notion Brandt is familiar with as he states, “Only through experimentation can you arrive at something new” (Paginton, 2011).

Matthew Brandt has showcased works throughout the United States as well as Europe, and in November 2016, produced his third solo show at the Yossi Milo gallery titled, “Night Skies” (2016). Often combining methods of image-making, such as painting, silkscreen and photography, Brandt successfully creates innovate and experimental pieces that capture the attention of the viewer. Methods of alternative photography are often used by Brandt, as in his series, “La Brea” (2014), where he explored archeological subject matter through the use of a heliograph. (What is a heliograph?)

I am drawn to the work of Matthew Brandt because similar to him, I often use outside materials as a way of physically altering film to convey meaning. In my personal practice, I frequently manipulate the physicality of the image to further enhance the message, and question “what really is a photograph?” and “when does an image stop being a photo?” I enjoyed reading about Brandt’s similar approaches and am interested in his use of alternative photography as a way to create images.

Technically, Brandt uses a wide range of materials and resources to create his works as a way of deepening the meaning and relationship between the piece and the message it is trying to convey. Through the incorporation of natural material, Brandt is also able to create a unique relationship that physically connects the image to the place.  Conceptually, Brandt is attempting to create a physical connection between photo and place, and examines the overall notion of photographic materiality. Through the intentional destruction of the image, Brandt is undoing the process of photography and ultimately exposing hidden meanings that can exists between the photo and the place. This methodology is something that I would like to try and incorporate in my final project.

Paginton, F. “Matthew Brandt”. Dazed. 2011. http://www.dazeddigital.com/photography/article/11080/1/matthew-brandt

“Matthew Brandt”. Artspace. 2017. https://www.artspace.com/matthew_brandt

“Matthew Brandt”. Yossi Milo Gallery. 2014. http://www.yossimilo.com/exhibitions/2014_03-matthew_brandt/

“Process”. Harry Ransom Center. N.d. http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/exhibitions/permanent/firstphotograph/process/

Photo I • PORTRAIT • PERSONA

 

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Werner Bischof | website | Magnum photography agency on Instagram | Magnum Photo Agency

 

Cindy Sherman

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Profile in the Guardian | MOMA | Art 21

Annie Leibovitz
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American Masters: Life Through A Lens. Bio | Image gallery | At Vanity Fair | Documentary

Yasumasa Morimura

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Luhring Augustine | At Saatchi Gallery

Nikki S. Lee

Nikki S. Lee: The Seniors Project

Nikki S. Lee: The Seniors Project

Nikki S. Lee: The Hispanic Project

Nikki S. Lee: The Hispanic Project

Niki S. Lee

Video interview at The Creator’s Project | Leslie Tonkonow Gallery | Analysis of Punk Project

Robert and Shana ParkeHarrison

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| Gaultier’s Dream | Architect’s Brother

Hat of Illumination

 

 

Anna Gaskell

Anna Gaskell

At the Guggenheim | Bio | Turns Gravity | Analysis of Gaskell’s use of light

 

Juul Kraijer

298grt
Book of photographs–see the book on Vimeo

Using Portraiture and Identity to Explore Queerness in South Africa | from Slate Magazine’s BEHOLD blog


Image :From Zanele Muholi’s series “Faces and Phases.”

 

 

 

 

Ellen

Endia Beal, who told me about her project in which she took white middle-aged women to a hair salon and gave them “black” hairstyles. She then took their photographs in the style of corporate headshots. Her work had a mix of humor and poignancy, a look at both race and gender; it quickly went viral.

“I wanted people that had a certain idea of what you’re supposed to look like in the workspace, because it would be a challenge for them to understand what I experienced in that space,” Beal said. “And to a degree, many young white women have shared that experience, but for older white women it’s an experience they haven’t necessarily had.”

 

 

 

 

Experiment #1: The Podcasts

JUST CHECKING: CAN YOU SEE COLOUR?

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You should be able to see a brown boat in the above image. If you can’t, you might have colour blindness.

REQUIRED LISTENING!

1. RADIOLAB
Listen to THIS episode of RADIOLAB. Click the LISTEN link at the top and you’ll hear the entire podcast. It is about one hour and eight minutes, but it’s broken into segments. Please listen to the ENTIRE podcast. It’s great!

After you listen to Radiolab podcast, watch this. Behold! Watch this Mantis Shrimp!

WHAT COLOUR IS THE SKY?
After listening to the RadioLab podcast, you might be thinking What colour is the sky?

2. THE FOSBURY FLOP!
CBC podcast, The Current | Mechanics of the Game Changers

Here is what high-jump looked like before Dick Fosbury. And here, is what the high-jump look like after Dick Fosbury. Further info about the Fosbury Flop technique.

 

2710: The Book

bookimage
Image from the Victoria and Albert Museum, collection of artist books

Ann Hamilton | Tropos

 

The Library of Babel, Jorge Luis Borges

Artist project as an infinite website:

Library of Babel as seen from within (Article in The Paris Review)

The Artful Accidents of Google Books [The New Yorker]

The Art of Google Books

Ed Ruscha: Various Small Fires and Milk

Ulises Carrion | exhibit | Video

Artist Books and Multiples

Multiples (in Amsterdam)

International Art Book Fair in Toronto

PRINTED MATTER!! in NYC!

Artist book collection at The Smithsonian

Artist book Collection At The Victorian and Albert Museum

Reed College | Artist Book digital collection

A Brief History of Artists’ Books (Yale)—use the tabs at the top of the article to explore institutions and collections of artists’ books–great reference.

Collections of Artists’ Books

The Center for Book Arts [New York City]

Minnesota Center for Book Arts

San Francisco Center for the Book

Artists’ Book Online | An online repository of facsimiles, metadata, and criticism

EVERY ITEM IN THE ARTISTS’ BOOK COLLECTION AT THE BANFF CENTRE  (WOW!)

Artist Book 3.0 (Where book artist talk shop online)

The Top 8 odd and outstanding artists’ books in Ryerson’s Special Collection

Altered Books at Pratt University

Water Yam | Artist book by George Brecht (Wikipedia entry)

Fluxus and how it relates to artists’ books

Found photo collage and pick up your stuff!

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You can pick up your work! I’ll be finished with it by 4pm tomorrow (Wednesday, December 16). If you’ve already left please email me and I’ll keep it in my office over the break.

The above collage is by Belgian artist Sammy Slabbinck. See more of his found photo work (including Vines) here.