Photo I : Pinhole Cameras and Photograms

GENERAL HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAMS
From Man Ray to Thomas Ruff—article
Good description with images
WILLIAM HENRY FOX TALBOT
Latticed_window_at_lacock_abbey_1835 LatticedWindowAtLacockAbbey| Photogenic Drawings | Arts Connected
ANNA ATKINS
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Festuca grasses from ‘British and Foreign Flowering Plants and Ferns’, c.1854
Brief Bio | The Getty | University of Texas, Austin

 

MAN RAY-Rayograms
DP106472
Metropolitan Museum of Art
At Aqua Velvet
General description of photography and surrealism

 

 

LASZLO MOHOLY NAGYDP106472
At MOMA | At the Getty Musuem

 

*CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS

ADAM FUSS
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• At Cheim & Reid
• At Fraenkel Gallery
• At Artists and Alchemists
• Good article with terrible formatting
Interview in BOMB magazine.

 

ALISON ROSSITERGuilleminot-Riviera-ca30-diptych 516dcd9059f80photo_high_8690

• Represented by Stephen Bulger (Toronto)
Yossi Milo (NY)
• Canadian Art profile
Article in Le Rencontres d’Arles
Video at Gallery Intell

 

GARY FABIAN MILLER2010_002_night-cell

Artist Website
Video and images at Victoria and Albert Museum
At Ingleby Gallery

SHADOW CATCHERS at The Victoria and Albert Museum
• Camera-less photo
techniques at Victoria and Albert Museum
A History of Camera-less Photography at the Victoria and Albert Museum.
A listing of all of the artists plus video interviews in the Camera-less Photography exhibit.

 

SUSAN DERGES

Susan Derges
Prix Pictet
Paul Kasmin Gallery
Video, commissioned by the Victoria and Albert Museum.
At Oxford University
At Danziger Gallery

 

ABELARDO MORELL
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Flashlight and Salt, photogram on 8×10 film
More of his photograms

 

 

THOMAS RUFF
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Photograms for the new age (interview in Aperture magazine)
See more work at David Zwirner gallery

 

 

Final Project Presentation: Chelsea Birnie

Performative Portraiture 

Francesca Woodman

Untitled 1975-80 by Francesca Woodman 1958-1981

Untitled, 1975-80, Gelatin silver print, 140 x 140 mm

Space?, Providence, Rhode Island, 1975-1978 1975-8 by Francesca Woodman 1958-1981

Space², Providence, Rhode Island, 1975-1978, Gelatin silver print, 140 x 140 mm

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Self-Deceit #1, Roma, 1977-78, Gelatin silver print, 140 x 140 mm

Tim Clark

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A Reading from the Lord’s Prayer, 1979. Performance at Mercer Union, Toronto. Photo: Alex Neuman

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Some Thoughts on the Question of Limits in Art, 1979. Performance at Optica, Montreal.

Adrian Piper

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Food for the Spirit #1, 1971, Gelatin Silver Print, 14.5 x 15″, ed. of 3

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Catalysis IV, 1971, Geltain Silver Print, 40.6 x 40.6 cm

Jemima Stehli

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Mirror no. 2, 2001, C-type print mounted on aluminium, 115 x 140 cm

Suzy Lake

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Choreographed Puppet #4-5, 1976 (2007 reprint), Chromogenic print, 41 1/2″

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Extended Breathing in the Garden, 2008-2010, Fuji-trans Print, Lightbox, 30 3/4″ x 44 3/4″ x 1 1/2″

Augustin Rebetez

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Arrière-tête (mécanismes), 2014, Digital

experimental processes and possibilities

Cameraless photographer by Alison Rossiter
A darkroom player who uses expired photographic papers from the 19th & 20th century to make pictures. Rossiter employs two processes in her work, time and darkroom play. She seeks out in boxes of expired photographic papers latent images left behind- fingerprints, mold, light leaks etc. – that can only be made by time. Or she selectively develops photographic papers by dipping and pouring, allowing the chemistry to make marks and shapes.
Video: Rossiter explains her work

Alison Rossiter (American, born 1953) Haloid Platina, exact expiration date unknown, about 1915, processed 2010 2010 Gelatin silver print

Alison Rossiter (American, born 1953)
Haloid Platina, exact expiration date unknown, about 1915, processed 2010
2010
Gelatin silver print

Alison Rossiter Eastman Kodak Velox, expired August 1941, processed 2013

Alison Rossiter
Eastman Kodak Velox, expired August 1941, processed 2013

Chemical creations by Mariah Robertson

Robertson’s image making process is all about chemical reactions and chance on photographic paper, led by instinct and informed by her formal experiences in the darkroom. The resulting abstractions are the result of experiments with darkroom chemistry, temperature and time (15hrs per 100′ roll).

Video: Mariah Robertson ART21 Close Up

Mariah Robertson 267, 2014 unique chemical treatment on RA-4 paper 73 x 88 x 2-3/4 inches

Mariah Robertson
267, 2014
unique chemical treatment on RA-4 paper
73 x 88 x 2-3/4 inches

Mariah Robertson Part Picture • group show at the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (MoCCA), Toronto • May 2 - 31, 2015

Mariah Robertson
Part Picture • group show at the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (MoCCA), Toronto • May 2 – 31, 2015

Alchemical quest of Ilan Wolff

Wolff’s series 4-Elements uses light (obviously) and the elements air, fire, water and earth. Heat for fire and earth, cold for water and for air the classic technique employing light energy. The images in his 4-Elements series record the chemical interactions that take place when photographic paper is subjected to an element as well as reveal a sensation of the element.

Ilan Wolff - 4 Elements Series - Water

Ilan Wolff – 4 Elements Series – Water

Ilan Wolf - 4 Elements Series - Earth

Ilan Wolf – 4 Elements Series – Earth

Website: Ilan Wolff’s website gallery

Rossiter, Robertson and Wolff all use performance and chance in combination with darkroom techniques in the processes of their work.

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untitled artifact

Final Project-Research Presentation: Brianna McArdle

My Interest: Framing, distortion, perception, and documentation.

Uta Barth 

“I am interested in the conventions of picture-making, in the desire to picture the world and in our relationship, our continual love for and fascination with pictures.”

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Ground #2, Chromogenic print on panel; 29.5 x 27.5 inches, 1992-1993.

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Field #20 & Field #21, Acrylic lacquer on canvas; 204 x 132 inches each, 1996.

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Field #22, Acrylic lacquer on canvas; 132 x 90 inches, 1996.

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nowhere near (Untitled 99.2), Chromogenic prints in artist frame; Diptych, 35 x 90 inches, 1999.

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nowhere near (Untitled 99.3), Chromogenic prints in artist frame; Diptych, 35 x 90 inches, 1999.

All images from Uta Barth’s website, filed under “Work”

  • Barth’s work is so much about seeing and subverting traditional perceptions of photography as she moves away from subject matter.
  • Her work becomes about observing and the act of looking.

Post from Marina

Consumption

johnson4

Geoff Johnson-Behind the Door

johnson3

Geoff Johnson-Behind the Door

johnson2

Geoff Johnson-Behind the Door

johnson1

Geoff Johnson-Behind the Door

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Brian Ulrich- Copia

Copia, Retail

Brian Ulrich- Copia

Copia, Retail

Brian Ulrich- Copia

ulrich4

Brian Ulrich

jordan3

Chris Jordan

jordan2

Chris Jordan- Circuit boards

jordan1

Chris Jordan- Cell phones #2

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Andreas Gursky

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Andreas Gursky-99 Cent

 

Melissa Benham- Final Project

Final Photography Project
Melissa Benham
Inspiration
Painting on Photographs!

  Gerhard Richter

Link: Gerhard Richter

Aliza Razell

        Link: Aliza Razell Art


Fabienne Rivory

Link: Fabieene Rivory Art

John Stexaker

 Sarah Anne Johnson

 

    Sarah Angelucci

Bec Wonders

Final Project – Research Presentation: Framing the Everyday

Joel Sternfeld

The collective American identity through the documentation of everyday people and locations

http://www.luhringaugustine.com/artists/joel-sternfeld

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Vineland, New Jersey, March 1972

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Grafton, West Virginia, February 1983

William Eggleston

“Monumentalize” everyday subject matter

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http://www.egglestontrust.com

https://www.artsy.net/artist/william-eggleston

 

Helen Levitt

Street photography

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https://www.moma.org/artists/3520

“7 lessons Helen Levitt has taught me about street photography”

WHAT IS PHOTOGRAPHY: Look and think about this

“You feel like the cord to the mother ship has been cut,” she said, “and now you’re floating in space.”

Carol Squiers, curator of the exhibition, What is a Photograph?

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Artie Vierkant’s “Image Object Friday 7 June 2013 4:33PM, 2013.”
Higher Pictures, New York

 

EXHIBITIONS
• What Is A Photograph?
| Exhibition at International Center of Photography.
NYTimes Review

THE NEXT BIG PICTURE: With Cameras Optional, The new directions in photography?  Good slide show with this one!

What are we talking about when we talk about photography?
(with apologies to Raymond Carver and if you don’t know who Raymond Carver is, my heart just broke a little)
A copy of the catalog for WHAT IS A PHOTOGRAPHY is available for browsing in the digital lab.

DUST MAN IS ACTUALLY CALLED: Berndnaut Smilde!

 

BOOKS and ARTISTS from THE EDGE OF VISIONMarco Breuer Untitled (Fuse), gelatin silver paper, burned, 1996
THE EDGE OF VISION

The Edge of Vision, Revisited.
The Edge of Vision VIDEO INTERVIEWS! with most of the artists!!
Lyle Rexer explains the book’s concept


WALEAD BESHTY
|Video at MOMA | Abstract Art or Photography

New Photography (2009) at MOMA | Blog with interviews and video

CARTER MULL
At Marc Foxx gallery

DANIEL GORDON
website | exhibition at New York Hortcultural Society of New York

SARA ANGELUCCI
website | Artist in Residence (2014) at the AGO

ALISON ROSSITER
Article/Interview in BorderCrossings

DRONESTAGRAM |
description of project
TREVOR PAGLEN (the artist who started Dronestragram)

Penelope Umbrico
Article about Penelope Umbrico

JOHN HOUCK

RISA HOROWITZ
| Imaging Saturn (images) | Imaging Saturn blog

CARA BARER
Interview about banal but significant objects  | Talking about her work in FeatureShoot.

THOMAS RUFF
At David Zwirner Gallery

VIK MUNIZ
website | film | At MIT

JESSICA EATON
website | Also search this blog, there are several interviews with her.

MIKKO SINERVO
Helsinki School

CARTER MULL
At Marc Foxx gallery |

DANIEL GORDON
|
website | exhibition at New York Hortcultural Society of New York

ADAM BROOMBERG and OLIVER CHANARIN
| website | The Day Nobody Died | Interview | At MOMA in the New Photography Show

General link for the New Photography Show at MOMA

MARCO BREUER
At Yossi Milo Gallery | Interview in St.Lucy

SARA ANGELUCCI
website | Artist in Residence at the AGO

ALISON ROSSITER
Article/Interview in BorderCrossings

2013 Le Mois de la Photo a Montreal

Dronestagram | description of project

PENELOPE UMBRICO
Article about Penelope Umbrico

JOHN HOUCK

TREVOR PAGLEN

THOMAS RUFF
Photograms for the New Age | At Gagosian Gallery

VIK MUNIZ
Website | Video at ICP

GARY FABIAN MILLER
website | In Camera-less photography at V&A musuem

CAMERA-LESS PHOTOGRAPHY at the Victoria and Albert Musuem
Directory of Artists (videos) |  Camera-less photography techniques

MARTIN KLIMAS
website

SARAH ANNE JOHNSON
At Stephen Bulger | Article in Border Crossings

 

Artists from the powerpoint for Assignment Three: What is Photography?

Guy Fabian Miller
John Pfahl
Liz Deschenes
Uta Barth
Ori Gershl
Martin Klimas
Dean Kessmann
Adam Fuss
Sara Greenberger Rafferty
Mike and Doug Starn (The Starn Twins)
Sarah Anne Johnson

Jason Salavon

Makers:
Robin Rhode | Interview with the artist
Thomas Demand
Holly Roberts
Molly Springfield
Laurie Simmons
Ann Hamilton (sculptor)
Andy Goldsworthy
Thomas Demand
Ruth Thorne Thomsen
Christian Boltanski
Robert Parke Harrison
Dieter Appelt
David Levinthal
Helen Van Meene
Laurie Simmons
Ann Hamilton (sculptor)
Andy Goldsworthy
Thomas Demand
Ruth Thorne Thomsen
Christian Boltanski
Robert Parke Harrison
Dieter Appelt
David Levinthal
Helen Van Meene
Abelardo Morell (amazing camera obscura)
Vik Muniz
Sigmar Polke
Gordon Matta-Clark
Aspen Mays

 

COLOR
Go here. It’s an amazing resource of artists and how they deal with colour.

 

THE ROOT of Photography and how it relates to painting
Watch: David Hockney’s, A Secret Knowledge, (part 1), (part 2), (part 3).

A contemporary film where a non-artist makes a camera obscura and tries to paint like Vermeer. (It’s great!) TIM’S VERMEER

And finally, thinking about drawing!

Paul Chiappe

These are tiny tiny tiny drawings, based on vintage, found, photographs. Go here (it’s a great site) for more information

 

OTHER RESOURCES
St.Lucy
(Interviews with photographers)

ICP VIDEO ARCHIVE

BORDER CROSSINGS, Issue#119

Go here. It’s an amazing resource of artists.

 

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All Images are from the NPR Picture Show blog. Lawrence with the 49-pound “Captive Airship.” Courtesy of the Lawrence Family

Before drones (and projects like Dronestagram) were used for photographic surveillance, people relied on balloons, kites and pigeons.  The camera in the above image was large enough to shoot large format film and required 9-17 kites to lift it.

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San Francisco Bay, 1906

Read the rest of the article and see more images here.

PIGEON CAM!
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A selection of images and pigeon cams | more about the origins, history and application | uses during war | The Pigeon Spy |

 

 

 

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After our conversation yesterday about the tension between analog and digital/fast and slow, I thought Emma and others would be interested in Bruno Ribeiro’s absurdist interpretation of Instagram.

And while we’re talking about Instagram, it’s worth mentioning, yet again, Dronestagram. And this:  Le Mois de la Photo a Montreal was Drone: The Automated Image. Search the site for better yet, download the program.

 

 

 

 

Assignment One: What Is Colour?

REQUIRED LISTENING!

1. RADIOLAB
Listen to THIS episode of RADIOLAB. Click the LISTEN link at the top and you’ll hear the entire podcast. It is about one hour and eight minutes, but it’s broken into segments. Please listen to the ENTIRE podcast. It’s great!

After you listen to Radiolab podcast, watch this. Behold! Watch this Mantis Shrimp!

WHAT COLOUR IS THE SKY?
After listening to the RadioLab podcast, you might be thinking What colour is the sky?

2. THE FOSBURY FLOP!
CBC podcast, The Current | Mechanics of the Game Changers

Here is what high-jump looked like before Dick Fosbury. And here, is what the high-jump look like after Dick Fosbury. Further info about the Fosbury Flop technique.


EXTRA MATERIAL FOR PERSONAL EDIFICATION (fun!)

Below is a link to a pdf  of the a few chapters of the text, Eye and Brain: The Psychology of Seeing by R.L.Gregory.

eye-brain-gregory
Read the following:
Chapter 1: SEEING
Chapter 2: LIGHT
Chapter 8: SEEING COLOUR

Quit grousing, the chapters are short and there are pictures.

 

JUST CHECKING: CAN YOU SEE COLOUR?

boat

You should be able to see a brown boat in the above image. If you can’t, you might have colour blindness.


THE SCIENCE OF COLOUR AND LIGHT
Optical illusions show how we see.

Color and Physics

Colour and light, explained by Bill Nye (the science guy).

Light Fantastic 4: Light, The Universe, and Everything.

A BBC video that explores, “the research on the strange relationship between light, the eye and mind, and the development of new technologies such as photography and film”

This is an interesting TED talk about Colour Theory.

 

THE HISTORY OF COLOUR MODELS
To augment our class discussion about colour, learn about the history of the colour wheel.

History of Color Models
Color Models
Color: Standford University Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Jason Salavon, pushes boundaries between photography/computer science/video etc.  Here is his interpretation of the Colour Wheel.

 

COLOUR AND LANGUAGE
This video explores the relationship between the development of language and the processing and understanding of colour.

 

**


RESOURCES ABOUT COLOUR and ARTISTS
Go here. It’s an amazing resource of artists.

OR, HERE TO THIS GREAT web-based component to a larger MOMA exhibition about reinventing color

Yves Klein | TATE Modern | MOMA

Sophie Calle | Chromatic Diet | Explanation about the project

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JESSICA EATON

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Jessica Eaton | Interview in The Believer | Her personal blog | Her professional site (click on galleries to access images) | Interview in Canadian Art | Good list of interviews
Lenscraft:Jessica Eaton Asks Us to Think About What We See

This following text is from various interviews with Eaton, published or referenced from her blog.

“She was aware of the science of light at work even in what she calls “normal” photographs, aware that subject and content buried those phenomena, preventing viewers from seeing what was there. In 2006, her work shifted and she began to bring those hidden elements to the forefront. She isolated light and color and time, even though to do so was to challenge the classical definition of photography as a way to capture a single moment.

“Using a wide array of experimental, analogue-based photographic techniques such as colour separation filters, multiple exposures, dark slides and in-camera masking Jessica Eaton builds images on sheets of 4×5 film that address fundamental properties of photography such as light, chance, duration, illusion and spatial relations.  Eaton has written: “I often set up parameters for phenomena to express itself. In the best of cases I push things so that the response comes in ways that I could not have thought up until I was shown it on film. Once you get to see or experience something you can use it. Then you can use it to see something else.”

A quote from a TIME magazine article:

“Canadian photographer Jessica Eaton uses her camera to create color invisible to the naked eye. She gives bright hues to gray forms in her series Cubes for Albers and LeWitt, and that work was recently awarded the photography prize at the 2012 Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography—a prize for which TIME’s director of photography Kira Pollack sat on the jury.

Jessica Eaton

“We’ve all mixed two colors of paint together, and either it makes another color or, if you keep going, it gets muddy and progressively gets darker,” she explains. “In light, things work really differently.” Eaton explains that she exploits the properties of light through additive color separation: whereas the primary pigment colors (red, blue, yellow) get darker as they blend, the primary colors of light (red, blue, green) move toward white. Eaton applies filters in those three colors to her camera and takes multiple exposures, a process that turns the gray form seen here into the vibrant ones seen above. “The color itself is mixed inside the camera,” she says.

One of the byproducts of Eaton’s process is an element of surprise: because her images are created within the camera, she doesn’t know what she’ll get until the photos are developed. “It’s a bit of a conversation with the world,” she says. “With the forces of time and space and contingency and errors that happen, because often there’s so many steps going into one of these, I get back something that’s also new to me, and those are the pictures that tend to end up in exhibits.”

But the photographer likes challenging definitions, and not just photographic ones. Although she dislikes the term “abstract” as a description of her work—it implies that the light she captures doesn’t exist in reality—Eaton says that her photographs acknowledge “how incredibly limited our ability to perceive the world is.” We lack the sensory mechanisms to see her colors with our naked eyes, and Eaton sees that as a metaphor for our inability to see the extent of the physical universe, whether it includes multiple dimensions or parallel universes. And, in that metaphor, she sees hope. “I love the idea that no matter how bad it gets,” she says, “there’s this wild so-called reality way beyond what we have decided it is.”