Photography and Memory

Becky Comber, Sky Edge, from the series Broken Horizons, 2013
Becky Comber, Sky Edge, from the series Broken Horizons, 2013

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Jessica Eaton, Cfaal 384, 2013, Courtesy Jessica Bradley Gallery

Hello Photographers!

I hope you’re having a good summer. Do you remember what you last photographed with your smart phone? There’s a reason for that.

Listen to this interview, which kicks off a series, about the connection between memory and photography.

Also, a reminder to get to Toronto and see the Contact Photography Festival before the end of May.

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Tim’s Vermeer, in Guelph!

Tim’s Vermeer!

I’ve mentioned the camera obscura and the film Tim’s Vermeer in both Photo I and Photo III. The movie is in Guelph, this week, at the Bookshelf Cinema.  If you’re old-fashioned enough to see movies legally, check it out. It’s playing Wednesday and Thursday at 6:30 and Friday at 7pm.

Here is the Rotten Tomatoes Review | Globe and Mail review

Don’t remember what I’m talking about? Review the camera obscura and its profound impact on the history of image making and painting here.

Final Project Research

For my final project for Photo III, I am working with my scanner to attempt to take pictures with it through the means of a camera obscura and a modified scanner.  My interest lies in the interest of combining new technology with the oldest known camera.  I am interested in creating photographs without the use of what everyone knows to be a conventional camera.  I am also interested in capturing images from film and videos, in an attempt to capture a moment in time that has already been captured, and then reassembled into a moment that can be viewed an infinite amount of times, through an infinite amount of devices.
A few artists and things that have inspired me, or stuck with me while I was thinking about this theme for my project were Hiroshi Sugimoto who captures images via long exposures of movie theatres, seascapes, and architectural buildings.  Although he uses a conventional camera, the images that are captured I find quite engaging and it is based on a similar work style in thematic and possibly visual aspects.  Another source of inspiration that I found helpful when thinking about my work is Idris Khan.  With his use of appropriation in some works and layering in most, the aesthetic qualities are visually compelling, but also aid in the ideas of using appropriation from different sources.  Another source of inspiration that is behind a lot of what I do is Gordon Matta-Clark. I find him to be a very compelling figure in the field of art, and the images that are provided as documentation of his works are very interesting to me.  Oh and also Simon Starling.

I have Links below to information about the artists mentioned and also the technical aspects of my project.

Simon Starling:
http://caseykaplangallery.com/cat/artists/starling/
simon starling lko

Gordon Matta-Clark:
http://www.davidzwirner.com/artists/gordon-matta-clark/survey/
Matta-Clark-Splitting

Idris Khan:
https://www.saatchigallery.com/artists/idris_khan.htm
Image

Hiroshi Sugimoto:
http://c4gallery.com/artist/database/hiroshi-sugimoto/hiroshi-sugimoto.html

Image
Image
Camera Obscura:
http://brightbytes.com/cosite/what.html

MOMA’s Version:
https://www.moma.org/collection/details.php?theme_id=10060
David Hockney’s Version:

Model for a camera obscura that is similar to the one I will be making:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwqemdN9zac

Scanner Camera:
http://makezine.com/projects/deluxe-scanner-camera/

Final Project: Research

Rineke Dijkstra's Beach Portaits

Rineke Dijkstra’s Beach Portraits

For my final project, I’ve been looking into conceptual portraiture as it is the direction I’m intending on moving towards and as it is the type of photography which interests me the most. Creating a powerful concept that viewers can relate to through portraits of others and possibly additional elements interacting with the subjects to support the concept is my main goal. To me, photographs with subjects that convey a strong message are the most powerful photographs. Therefore, I’ve been researching different technical ways of shooting portraits including natural settings as well as constructed sets with studio lighting, while also being inspired by all the various concepts that have been experimented with and exhibited and by all the stories that are told through conceptual portraits.

Through looking for inspiration, I have come across a couple links that inspired my final idea. The links explore photographers who used various subjects to create a series of portraits that gave off a particular conceptual message to their audience.

Phillip Toledano’s Hope & Fear was one of the projects that was most inspiring to me as he used Surrealism to create highly unusual and interesting photographs which expressed his message loudly and clearly. The way Toledano expressed the meaning of his project was by stating that the project was a “is the external manifestation of internal desires and paranoia that are adrift in contemporary American society. What are we afraid of? What do we love? How does our society function, and what does it worship?”

Further explanation of Toledano’s conceptual, technical and formal methodologies including an interview with Toledano himself.

Another inspiring project by Phillip Toledano.

An online book that I thought was an interesting read involving all things portraiture: Portraiture by Shearer West. (Might require UoGuelph library log-in)

What Makes A Great Portrait?

More conceptual portraits:
‘Humanae’ Portraits Match People of Different Ethnicities With Their Pantone Color

Fascinating Portraits of Young People Out Clubbing In Rural Spain

Photos of Rural Children Around the World Dressed Up As Their Dream Professions

Disconcerting Portraits of People Wearing Origami Animal Masks

Portraits of Kids From A Deprived Area in the UK

Besides conceptual factors, Chris Levine’s use of light and colour in his photographs as well as in his exhibition were technical factors that were equally as inspiring to me.

If you are interested in portraiture as well and have access to the University of Guelph Library there are also several compelling photography books that I have found to really inspire my thought process. These include “Face: The New Photographic Portrait” by William A. Weing, “At Work” by Anne Leibovitz, “Close Up” by Katharina Sieverding, “Portaits in Series” by Kerber, “Contemporaries: A Photographic Series” by Judith Joy Ross and “Studio Photography: Essential Skills” by John Child for technical matters – all of which could be found in the TR section on the 5th floor of the library.

Before Dronestagram…

geo-lawrence-1

All Images are from the NPR Picture Show blog. Lawrence with the 49-pound “Captive Airship.” Courtesy of the Lawrence Family

Before drones (and projects like Dronestagram) were used for photographic surveillance, people relied on balloons, kites and pigeons.  The camera in the above image was large enough to shoot large format film and required 9-17 kites to lift it.

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San Francisco Bay, 1906

Read the rest of the article and see more images here.

PIGEON CAM!
449px-Dr_Julius_Neubronner_patented_a_miniature_pigeon_camera_activated_by_a_timing_mechanism,_1903

A selection of images and pigeon cams | more about the origins, history and application | uses during war | The Pigeon Spy |

 

2610 : Camera Lucida

Roland-Barthes-in-1978-007

This is Roland Barthes

This (below) is every page of Roland Barthe’s Camera Lucida,as scanned by the artist, Idris Khan.

everypagecidriskhancourtestyvmirogall372
Idris Khan, Every Page of Roland Barthes’s Book Camera Lucida (2004)

An essay about the above image and Idris Khan’s work. At Saatchi Gallery
At Sean Kelly gallery | At Victoria- Miro gallery

LINKS RELATED TO CAMERA LUCIDA

Cameras Are Clocks For Seeing!
Article about Camera Lucida and Barthes in The Believer

Re-reading Camera Lucida in The Guardian

Summary from University of Chicago

Very brief Summary on Slideshare

Another summary

Roland Barthes Bio |

Final Project Help | Resources

Research | The importance of looking.

This list is by no means exhaustive, but it is a good place to start.

Museum | Gallery websites
THIS
is a great list of photography-related museums
Saatchi Gallery
Tate Modern
Metropolitan Museum of Art
The British Museum
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Smithsonian Cooper-Hewittt National Design Museum
Smithsonian American Art Museum
Centre Pompidou (Paris)
Guggenheim (Bilbao)
Guggenheim (NY)
MOMA
The J.Paul Getty Museum
MIT open courseware
Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO)
Musee d’Art Contemporain (Montreal)
Wexner Center for the Arts
Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago)

National Gallery of Canada
Victoria and Albert Museum

International Center of Photography. Especially their BLOG and their searchable image database/archive.

Magazines | Online Journals
Aperture Magazine (Especially the weekly blog)
The F Stop (professional photographers discuss their craft)
Border Crossings
Frieze Magazine
Art Forum
Art Papers
Canadian Art
Feature Shoot
(interviews with contemporary photographers)
Conscientious Extended
St. Lucy

Monoskop: A wiki for art and culture

Ciel Variable : The Archives

Shooting Gallery

OTIS College on YouTube (excellent resources for artist interviews, lectures, etc)

Art 21

My Modern Met

Miraprospekt

Artsy

Scholarly websites
TATE research
Smart History

Journal of Contemporary Art

Art Facts
Images: A Journal of Film and Popular Culture
Arts section of New York Times
Subject and Course guides from The U of G library

PHOTOGRAPHY at the Smithsonian Magazine

Keeping Track of your Research
Delicious
Creating a Google Alert. Tips for getting the results you want

Texture • Breaking the photographic surface Photo-based installationConstructed environments
roberts92

• Above image by Holly Roberts
• Drawings based on photographs, at the scale of 35mm negatives: Paul Chiappe
Robert Parke Harrison especially The Architect’s Brother

march23_yorku
Above image by Sara Angelucci
• Thomas Demand | website | about a recent exhibit in Montreal
• Annette Messager | about | interview in Bomb | interview/review in The Guardian |
Aspen Mays
• Christian Boltanski | Marian Goodman gallery | MOMA | Park Avenue Armory (scroll for video)
Robin Rhodes | At White Cube | At Lehmann Maupin | On this blog
STILL LIFE
Tree-1Tree-2
Tidying Up! (above images by Ursus Wehrli)
Ursus Wehrli | TED talk
Tony Cragg
Tony Cragg
Not sure what category this belong in, other than the GOOD! category
Ryan Park, Medium

Street Photographers

Helen Levitt
Stephen Shore
Robert Frank
Gary Winogrand
Lee Friedlander
Mary Ellen Mark
Bruce Davidson
Joel Meyerowitz
James Nachtwey
Black Star Agency
Magnum Photo Agency
And, I say this all the time, The New York Times Lens BlogThis is a good beginning, search this blog or any of the other zillion resources I’ve posted.

Call for Artists and 1,000 new planets.

Any SART 4700ers who work with alternative, analog processes, this is for you!

(Hello, Katie, Emma, Peter, Sam (honorary SART 4700), Susannah…)

CALL FOR ARTISTS
The Dark Room 3.0 is a forum to showcase the many processes of analog and alternative process photography, and the exciting work these methods produce. The Dark Room 3.0 will take place during the Scotiabank Contact Photography Festival in 2014.

More info and submission guideline. (Do it!)

 

Kep

New Planets! KEPLER!
Stop being bummed about Pluto’s demotion to non-planet status. 1000 new planets!

And while we’re talking about science, let’s talk about Neil DeGrasse Tyson and his awesome podcast, StarTalk Radio. Astrophysicist! (nothin’ more to say.)