Victoria Coles: Photo 3 Final Assignment

What is my series considering?

  • Colour
  • Beauty in the Banal
  • Overconsumption/mass consumption

Colour
The nature of this project is colour, how they interact, how they can stand out from the crowd. It is fundamental to the act of seeing. It is hard to separate colour from the sight. Colour alone, without context (in an abstract form) can create a story, a feeling, a person.

Colour Wheels

Newton and Gothe
While not artists but theorist, these two individuals have a significant impact on my piece. The colours, and medium give the feel of true pigments, and reference to the colour wheels of past.

Colour Sphere- theory of colour by Geothe

Theory of Colour- Colour Sphere

024_harris1a Goethe_Schiller_Die_Temperamentenrose 250px-Goethe,_Farbenkreis_zur_Symbolisierung_des_menschlichen_Geistes-_und_Seelenlebens,_1809

Kladinsky
The “first” abstract painter was inspired by an old painting of his turned on its side. The removal of referential objects allowed the full impact of pure colour to work on his senses. He believed that objects were only obstructing his direct communion with colour.
Vassily_Kandinsky,_1923_-_Circles_in_a_Circle color-study-squares-with-concentric-circles-1913(1).jpg!Blog

Artist- Mark Rothko, Multi forms
http://www.markrothko.org/

Considered one of “the foremost of modern colourist”. “Bright Earth” by Philip Ball
Rothko had a notion that viewers of his work should cry from the emotions they felt from viewing it. He had an amazing understanding of colour, how one colour could enforce another, and how all colours can cause emotions. His paintings are abstract and rely on colour, however, Rothko expressed that the paintings were of something. The colours were simply his way of depicting the emotions and feelings of the moment or thing he felt called to paint.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPoQeuWybIo

Rothko Multiforms earth-green black-in-deep-red violet-black-orange-yellow-on-white-and-red Saffron 1957 by Mark Rothko OSA253  orange-and-yellowuntitled-1969-mark-rothko

http://www.theoculusonline.com/the-eye-mark-rothkos-multiform-series/

This black and grey series were done near the end of Rothko’s life. While you may think that these colours represented a dark, lonely or looming end. However, Rothko explained that colour for him was to reference emotions, and bright colours often conjure the feeling of pain (explained by Rothko’s daughter as she reflects on conversations with her father about these paintings)

Lecture ft. Rothko’s son
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7QpVRH6WUkY

Documentary
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZ1Lvdf9FIA

Clip from MOMA
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSiu8qzHV6c

Beauty in the Banal

During my exploration of a fall portrait. Particular colours which seems out of place grabbed my attention, realizing that we often view things, but we don’t really see them. This process lead me to think of the banal moments in our every day life. We live these moments, such as making your bed in the morning, or waiting on the bus, that we view in complete boredom. However, imagine if you were to really look, and saw the beauty in each image, each moment. Colours shape our world, but I worry that we see it in black and white.

Mass consumption of images

Like with many pop artist, I am concerned with mass consumption of our era. However, my concern is for the consumption of images and moments as opposed to items. We take for granted the moments we live and the images we see, ignoring the striking beauty of each. This concept goes hand in hand with the beauty in the banal. I hope that in my exploration, I am able to bring a new appreciation to every moment. I believe there to be a link between how we consume images, and how we consume colour.

Artist- Andy Warhol

“Art does nothing more than mirror the culture that produces it.”  Bright Earth , Philip Ball (318)

Unlike Warhol who uses repetition to mimic the process of our mass consumption, I hope to do the opposite. Through my repetition, I hope my images causes the viewer to slow down and absorb the image. Creating a moment where a viewer may be able to experience the opposite of the mass consumption of images they  view every day.

Additionally, Warhol was interested in the banality of photography.

https://books.google.ca/books?id=1rUQsBbCUhYC&pg=PT88&lpg=PT88&dq=photographers+interested+in+the+banal&source=bl&ots=LxhF9yFP6k&sig=nIfKoksRkFYeDLMzXpbFX4EfJrc&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CCMQ6AEwAWoVChMIv9iyyMeCyQIVCP0eCh1ScQCX#v=onepage&q=photographers%20interested%20in%20the%20banal&f=false

Andy Warhol Cocacola Bottles Pop Art Campbell's Soup Cans Andy Warhol Pop ArtMarilyn- Andy Warhol

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Seeing vs Perception

AFTERIMAGE

10bggjohns op flag

Painting by Jasper Johns. An example of an after image. Stare at the white dot for 30 seconds (don’t look away), then look at a grey surface, you should see the afterimage.

Examples and discussions of color effect.

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EDWIN LAND
Video about Edwin Land (the inventor of Polaroid) and his two color process.

An article describing the relationship between Edwin Land’s experiments and James Clark Maxwell’s discoveries.

CMYK
Short film, creative interpretation of cymk in everyday printing (cereal boxes, etc)

FOUNDATIONS of VISION: COLOR
Fantastic resource via Stanford University

ALTERED PERCEPTION and VISION
Dr. George Stratton

Dr. George Stratton’s original article,
SOME PRELIMINARY EXPERIMENTS ON VISION WITHOUT INVERSION OF THE RETINAL IMAGE.

Summary and explanation of Stratton’s work, courtesy of the staff of San Francisco’s Museum of Science, Art, and Human Perception.

Newer article, based on Stratton’s research.

Great WIRED article about neuroplasticity, vision, and perception.

Video showing inverted vision experiments: Living in a Reversed World.

The illusion of colour constancy | Color Subjectivity | Living in the past
Video.
Is your red my red? No. It isn’t.

The neurological lag between seeing light and understanding/processing light.

What is video, anyway?

 

Assignment One • Resources • Artists

Sophie Calle | Chromatic Diet | Explanation about the project

sophiemon5

sophitues1

sophiewed

sophiethurs1

sophiefri

sophiesat

sundaysophie

sophiesunday1

Georges Rousse | artist website | Bending Space documentary about Durham Project | trailer | Bending Space website

georges-rousse_1

georges-rousse_2

georges-rousse_3

Liz Wolfe | Happiness is Contagious
Guy Bourdin | Fashion photography

For more resources about various artists and colour, see this post, related to Assignment One.

cfaal 241 tumblr_mrzqleFFzM1qkdlfoo1_500

Jessica Eaton | Interview in The Believer | Her personal blog | Her professional site (click on galleries to access images) | Interview in Canadian Art | Good list of interviews

This following text is from various interviews with Eaton, published or referenced from her blog.

“She was aware of the science of light at work even in what she calls “normal” photographs, aware that subject and content buried those phenomena, preventing viewers from seeing what was there. In 2006, her work shifted and she began to bring those hidden elements to the forefront. She isolated light and color and time, even though to do so was to challenge the classical definition of photography as a way to capture a single moment.

“Using a wide array of experimental, analogue-based photographic techniques such as colour separation filters, multiple exposures, dark slides and in-camera masking Jessica Eaton builds images on sheets of 4×5 film that address fundamental properties of photography such as light, chance, duration, illusion and spatial relations.  Eaton has written: “I often set up parameters for phenomena to express itself. In the best of cases I push things so that the response comes in ways that I could not have thought up until I was shown it on film. Once you get to see or experience something you can use it. Then you can use it to see something else.”

A quote from a TIME magazine article:

“Canadian photographer Jessica Eaton uses her camera to create color invisible to the naked eye. She gives bright hues to gray forms in her series Cubes for Albers and LeWitt, and that work was recently awarded the photography prize at the 2012 Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography—a prize for which TIME’s director of photography Kira Pollack sat on the jury.

Jessica Eaton

“We’ve all mixed two colors of paint together, and either it makes another color or, if you keep going, it gets muddy and progressively gets darker,” she explains. “In light, things work really differently.” Eaton explains that she exploits the properties of light through additive color separation: whereas the primary pigment colors (red, blue, yellow) get darker as they blend, the primary colors of light (red, blue, green) move toward white. Eaton applies filters in those three colors to her camera and takes multiple exposures, a process that turns the gray form seen here into the vibrant ones seen above. “The color itself is mixed inside the camera,” she says.

One of the byproducts of Eaton’s process is an element of surprise: because her images are created within the camera, she doesn’t know what she’ll get until the photos are developed. “It’s a bit of a conversation with the world,” she says. “With the forces of time and space and contingency and errors that happen, because often there’s so many steps going into one of these, I get back something that’s also new to me, and those are the pictures that tend to end up in exhibits.”

But the photographer likes challenging definitions, and not just photographic ones. Although she dislikes the term “abstract” as a description of her work—it implies that the light she captures doesn’t exist in reality—Eaton says that her photographs acknowledge “how incredibly limited our ability to perceive the world is.” We lack the sensory mechanisms to see her colors with our naked eyes, and Eaton sees that as a metaphor for our inability to see the extent of the physical universe, whether it includes multiple dimensions or parallel universes. And, in that metaphor, she sees hope. “I love the idea that no matter how bad it gets,” she says, “there’s this wild so-called reality way beyond what we have decided it is.”

ARTISTS
These are the artists we discussed in class today. If you want to review the images (and you should, you should look and look and look until you just can’t look anymore) the Powerpoint file is posted on the Courselink.

Amazing resource of artists from Tate Liverpool.
Web-based component to a larger MOMA exhibition about reinventing color

These aren’t listed in order
Cynthia Greg
Ed Burtynsky
Jan Groover
Elina Brotherus
Gage and Betterton
Manjari Sharma
Eileen Cowin
Linda Troeller
Olafur Eliasson
Alex Kisilevich
Joel Sternfeld
Amy Stein
Julia Fullerton-Batten
Richard Billingham
Martin Parr
William Eggleston
Stephen Shore
Andres Serrano
Joel Meyerwitz
Andreas Gursky
Sandy Skoglund
Anthony Hernandez

Reinventing Colour

Go here. It’s an amazing resource of artists.
Or here!
History of Color Models

Color Models
Color: Standford University Encyclopedia of Philosophy

OR, HERE TO THIS GREAT web-based component to a larger MOMA exhibition about reinventing color

What about this?

This video explores the relationship between the development of language and the processing and understanding of colour.