Photo III + LIVE Art = Performing for the camera

Image

The relationship between what we see and what we know is never settled.
—John Berger, from Ways of Seeing.
The book • The BBC series • A summary
Saut
Yves Klein (French, 1928–1962). Leap into the Void, 1960. Gelatin silver print; Image: 25.9 x 20 cm

Photography is intrinsic performance, in short, photography is weird.
• Exceeds human vision
• Stops time (democratic, cheap superpower)
• Flattens space
• Always in the past

 

1. EXCEEDS HUMAN VISION

EADWEARD MUYBRIDGE
(the o.g. animated gif)
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A collection of newly animated gifs from the stills | Great NPR story
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Woman Dancing at Night, 1887

The Victorian Peeper | The Smithsonian | Muybridge at TATE Britain AthletesPosturingPlate1151879fromTheAttitudesofAnimalsinMotion+small
Athletes Posing, 1879

 

HAROLD EDGERTON
GusSolomons
Dancer Gus Solomon.

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B015292

 

 

JESSICA EATON
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JESSICA EATON | Interview in The Believer | Her personal blog | Her professional site (click on galleries to access images) | Interview in Canadian Art | Good list of interviews
Lenscraft:Jessica Eaton Asks Us to Think About What We See

As critic Gabrielle Moser has noted: “It’s hard to discern just what we’re seeing in some of Eaton’s images. They encourage a prolonged process of contemplation, asking us to think about how we, and the camera, see. If we’re accustomed to seeing photographs as images frozen in time, Eaton’s works wriggle loose, teasing the eye with their refusal to stay fixed.”
Above Text from Canadian Art | Why Jessica Eaton Has Rocketed Onto the Art Radar in Canada & Beyond

 

 

JULIA FULLERTON BATTEN

Dressing Gown, Julia Fullerton Batten

Dressing Gown, Julia Fullerton Batten

Interview | Her body of work, In Between |

 

 

FRANCESCA WOODMAN | TATE Modern | New York Review of Books
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Francesca Woodman: House #3, Providence, Rhode Island, 1976

selfportrait_in_bathtub

 

 

THOMAS EDWARDS | The Dust Series

Thomas Edwards - Dust Series

 

 

2. FLATTENS SPACE (translates 3D to 2D)

ELISE WINDSOR | Mise en abyme |

Ovoid-Left
Ovoid Left, 2011

 

Helen Levitt | At MOMA | At Lawrence Miller Galleryjoel-meyerowitz2-660x433 CRI_188362

 

 

 

JOHN PFAHL | Altered Landscapes

John Pfahl, 1974 John Pfahl, 1975

 

 

GEORGES ROUSSE | artist website | Bending Space documentary about Durham Project | trailer | Bending Space website

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georges-rousse_2

georges-rousse_3

 

 

PRESERVES THE EPHEMERAL
Berndnaut-Smilde-01
BERNDNAUT SMILDE | Clouds | Artist website

 

MAKE TIN FOIL LOOK LIKE STEEL

ROBERT and SHANA PARKE HARRISON430

| Gaultier’s Dream | Architect’s Brother

 

 

EMBODY ANOTHER or THE OTHER or ANYONE BUT YOU, unless that’s what you’re into
In addition to the usual suspects: THIS blog post will be helpful (repeat for the Photo III)
Cindy Sherman
Niki S. Lee
Chris Ironside | Mr. Long Weekend
Collier Schorr | ART 21 | Forests and Fields

LAURIE SIMONS | website
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Walking Purse, 1989

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Yellow Hair/Red Coat/Snow/Selfie, 2014
From the series, Kigurumi, Dollers and How We See (2014)
Exhibit info At Salon 94

 

YASUMASA MORIMURA730e4200

HepburnBW0

Luhring Augustine | At Saatchi Gallery

GILLIAN WEARING | TATEWhite Chapel | Review in The Guardian | Guggenheim | All Day Everyday | Check out the “Dancing in Peckham” video

'I'm desperate' 1992-3 by Gillian Wearing OBE born 1963
Signs that say what you want them to say and not Signs that say what someone else wants you to say 1992-3

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Gillian Wearing, Self-Portrait at Three Years Old, 2004. Chromogenic print, 182 x 122 cm, edition 5/6. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum,

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Self Portrait as My Brother Richard Wearing.

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As Robert Mapplethorpe

 

ANNA GASKELL
At the Guggenheim | Bio | Turns Gravity | Analysis of Gaskell’s use of light
Anna Gaskell

 

GESTURAL INSPIRATION

Mark Morris Dance Group | website |
VIDEO! | Photo gallery | You Tube
Martha Graham Dance
Dayton Contemporary Dance
Garth Fagan Dance
Savion Glover | Video
Sammy Davis Jr and Gregory Hines
And, there is never, ever, anything better than this or this

 

ODDBALL
Rube Goldberg Machine and a fun video from OK GO!

AND FINALLY….

And just how did Yves Klein make that image?

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Assignment One • Resources • Artists

Sophie Calle | Chromatic Diet | Explanation about the project

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sophitues1

sophiewed

sophiethurs1

sophiefri

sophiesat

sundaysophie

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Georges Rousse | artist website | Bending Space documentary about Durham Project | trailer | Bending Space website

georges-rousse_1

georges-rousse_2

georges-rousse_3

Liz Wolfe | Happiness is Contagious
Guy Bourdin | Fashion photography

For more resources about various artists and colour, see this post, related to Assignment One.

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Jessica Eaton | Interview in The Believer | Her personal blog | Her professional site (click on galleries to access images) | Interview in Canadian Art | Good list of interviews

This following text is from various interviews with Eaton, published or referenced from her blog.

“She was aware of the science of light at work even in what she calls “normal” photographs, aware that subject and content buried those phenomena, preventing viewers from seeing what was there. In 2006, her work shifted and she began to bring those hidden elements to the forefront. She isolated light and color and time, even though to do so was to challenge the classical definition of photography as a way to capture a single moment.

“Using a wide array of experimental, analogue-based photographic techniques such as colour separation filters, multiple exposures, dark slides and in-camera masking Jessica Eaton builds images on sheets of 4×5 film that address fundamental properties of photography such as light, chance, duration, illusion and spatial relations.  Eaton has written: “I often set up parameters for phenomena to express itself. In the best of cases I push things so that the response comes in ways that I could not have thought up until I was shown it on film. Once you get to see or experience something you can use it. Then you can use it to see something else.”

A quote from a TIME magazine article:

“Canadian photographer Jessica Eaton uses her camera to create color invisible to the naked eye. She gives bright hues to gray forms in her series Cubes for Albers and LeWitt, and that work was recently awarded the photography prize at the 2012 Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography—a prize for which TIME’s director of photography Kira Pollack sat on the jury.

Jessica Eaton

“We’ve all mixed two colors of paint together, and either it makes another color or, if you keep going, it gets muddy and progressively gets darker,” she explains. “In light, things work really differently.” Eaton explains that she exploits the properties of light through additive color separation: whereas the primary pigment colors (red, blue, yellow) get darker as they blend, the primary colors of light (red, blue, green) move toward white. Eaton applies filters in those three colors to her camera and takes multiple exposures, a process that turns the gray form seen here into the vibrant ones seen above. “The color itself is mixed inside the camera,” she says.

One of the byproducts of Eaton’s process is an element of surprise: because her images are created within the camera, she doesn’t know what she’ll get until the photos are developed. “It’s a bit of a conversation with the world,” she says. “With the forces of time and space and contingency and errors that happen, because often there’s so many steps going into one of these, I get back something that’s also new to me, and those are the pictures that tend to end up in exhibits.”

But the photographer likes challenging definitions, and not just photographic ones. Although she dislikes the term “abstract” as a description of her work—it implies that the light she captures doesn’t exist in reality—Eaton says that her photographs acknowledge “how incredibly limited our ability to perceive the world is.” We lack the sensory mechanisms to see her colors with our naked eyes, and Eaton sees that as a metaphor for our inability to see the extent of the physical universe, whether it includes multiple dimensions or parallel universes. And, in that metaphor, she sees hope. “I love the idea that no matter how bad it gets,” she says, “there’s this wild so-called reality way beyond what we have decided it is.”

ARTISTS
These are the artists we discussed in class today. If you want to review the images (and you should, you should look and look and look until you just can’t look anymore) the Powerpoint file is posted on the Courselink.

Amazing resource of artists from Tate Liverpool.
Web-based component to a larger MOMA exhibition about reinventing color

These aren’t listed in order
Cynthia Greg
Ed Burtynsky
Jan Groover
Elina Brotherus
Gage and Betterton
Manjari Sharma
Eileen Cowin
Linda Troeller
Olafur Eliasson
Alex Kisilevich
Joel Sternfeld
Amy Stein
Julia Fullerton-Batten
Richard Billingham
Martin Parr
William Eggleston
Stephen Shore
Andres Serrano
Joel Meyerwitz
Andreas Gursky
Sandy Skoglund
Anthony Hernandez