Final Project Research

ERIK LEVY

“Creation is an uncontrolled muscle” according to Arik Levy (born 1963).

Artist, technician, photographer, designer, video artist, Levy’s skills are multi–disciplinary and his work can be seen in prestigious galleries and museums worldwide. Best known publicly for his sculptures – such as his signature Rock pieces –, his installations, limited editions and design, Levy nevertheless feels “The world is about people, not objects.”

Hailing originally from Israel and moving to Europe after his first participation in a group sculpture exhibition in Tel–Aviv in 1988, Levy currently works in his studio in Paris.

His formation was unconventional where surfing, as well as his art and graphic design studio, took up much of his time back home. Following studies at the Art Center Europe in Switzerland he gained a distinction in Industrial Design in 1991.

After a stint in Japan where he consolidated his ideas producing products and pieces for exhibitions, Levy returned to Europe where he contributed his artistry to another field – contemporary dance and opera by way of set design.

The creation of his firm then meant a foray back to his first love, art and industrial design, as well as other branches of his talents. Respected for his furniture and light designs on all continents, Levy also creates hi–tech clothing lines and accessories for firms in the Far East.

Considering himself now more of a “feeling” artist, Arik Levy continues to contribute substantially to our interior and exterior milieu, his work including public sculpture, as well as complete environments that can be adapted for multi use. “Life is a system of signs and symbols,” he says, “where nothing is quite as it seems.”

 

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I enjoy his work because the materials he uses distort what you are looking at. I find he uses his materials in different forms whether it being a closed form or a bunch of planes stuck together. I enjoy his pieces outside and love how they change throughout the day due to lighting.

SEBASTIAN MAGNANI

Born 1985 in a small village in Canton Valais, Switzerland, surrounded by mountains, Sebastian Magnani discovered photography whilst training as a media designer in 2006. After 5 years as a creative in an advertising agency, he decided 2011 to turn his passion into a profession. Since then he has been making a living as a photographer, based in Zurich Switzerland. He currently works on various subjects and several free projects, like the «Underdogs» and «Undercats», where got a lot of media attention and been published on many newspapers, magazines, websites and tv-shows around the globe.

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I enjoy his work because it takes one thing (the sky) and puts it somewhere else (the ground) which kind of makes you question what you are looking at and trying to imagine the environment. I feel like it causes a 2D photo experience to be more immersive as you actually what to know what is happening outside the frame.

DENISE RIESEN

Denise Riesen is an award-winning photographer with more then 16 years experience. Her work has varied in style and has evolved as she travels both physically around the world, and through the stages of her own life. Her work expands and alters that of a traditional scene into a complex visual interest. She enjoys the constant challenge of new ways of seeing and the creative output of self expression.

Denise has both studied and photographed extensively throughout the North America and Europe through personal travel and professional involvement. Her work has been shown in a number of galleries within the United States and Mexico. Denise has worked as a photo editor, and curator for a number of exhibits both in Chicago and New York City.

Denise currently works primarily as a freelance photographer and artist based in the Chicago area.

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She gave me the idea of water being a reflective surface or a material to distort the surroundings for my photographs.

Final Thoughts

With ideas from these artists I also want to try working with tin foil, glass, mirrors, water, acetate, and cutlery to create a distorted perception of what the viewer is looking at while also creating a visually beautiful image.

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Rachel Meneguzzi – Final Project Research Presentation

Erik Kessels

http://www.kesselskramer.com/exhibitions/24-hrs-of-photos

24hrs_of_photos Erik

24 HRS in Photos

– Installation of 1 million photos uploaded to Flickr, Facebook and Google in 24 hours.

– Shows how we constantly overwhelmed by the amount of images we are presented and have access to.

– Shows how public our private life has become.

Penelope Umbrico

http://www.penelopeumbrico.net/

– Uses appropriation and extraction from social media and online shopping sites (flickr, craigslist, ebay).

– Uses subjects that are collectively photographed, and then collects them herself.

– Has a strong interest on how images function differently online than print-based images.

– Aspects of “images-blindness” (as discussed in the third reading).

sunset
Sunsets from Flickr

– Every image of a sunset uploaded to Flickr.

Tv1 Tv2

T.V’s From Craigslist

Images of televisions put up for sale on craigslist.

– The photographs provide an extremely personal space to the viewer through the reflection of the interior of the room and the photographer

– The people taking the photographs don’t realise how personal these images really are and uploading them online for anyone to see, in the same way that people looking to buy a television are not noticing the reflections.

My idea

– The overwhelming amount of images we see daily distorts the way we view things just as the overwhelming amount of time we spend on our phones distorts the way we experience things.

– To critique not only image-blindness but experience-blindness that technology, cell phones in particular, impart on us.

– I want to show that our private life has become public through the use of social media because of this, we are losing social skills

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngt1JK3DyOU

Siobhan: Photo III Final Assignment

Interested in exploring:

  • image consumption
    • how we look at images
    • why we look at images
    • where we look at images
      • social media- Pinterest, Flickr, Google, Instagram
      • through a screen- phone, computer
  • Photographing the act of unsustained looking
    • quick
    • looking but not looking
    • scrolling action

Artists:

  1. Jason Salavon
  • popular culture
  • technology- designs software algorithms

2. Penelope Umbrico

  • interested in how we use images as a culture
    • entertainment
    • share- identity
  • function of social media and “pre-scripted images”
  • methods involve appropriation, extraction and repetition

3. Erik Kessels

  • social media and the abundance of images on the Internet
  • image consumption

Samples

sample1 sample2 sample3

Final Project: Research

Rineke Dijkstra's Beach Portaits

Rineke Dijkstra’s Beach Portraits

For my final project, I’ve been looking into conceptual portraiture as it is the direction I’m intending on moving towards and as it is the type of photography which interests me the most. Creating a powerful concept that viewers can relate to through portraits of others and possibly additional elements interacting with the subjects to support the concept is my main goal. To me, photographs with subjects that convey a strong message are the most powerful photographs. Therefore, I’ve been researching different technical ways of shooting portraits including natural settings as well as constructed sets with studio lighting, while also being inspired by all the various concepts that have been experimented with and exhibited and by all the stories that are told through conceptual portraits.

Through looking for inspiration, I have come across a couple links that inspired my final idea. The links explore photographers who used various subjects to create a series of portraits that gave off a particular conceptual message to their audience.

Phillip Toledano’s Hope & Fear was one of the projects that was most inspiring to me as he used Surrealism to create highly unusual and interesting photographs which expressed his message loudly and clearly. The way Toledano expressed the meaning of his project was by stating that the project was a “is the external manifestation of internal desires and paranoia that are adrift in contemporary American society. What are we afraid of? What do we love? How does our society function, and what does it worship?”

Further explanation of Toledano’s conceptual, technical and formal methodologies including an interview with Toledano himself.

Another inspiring project by Phillip Toledano.

An online book that I thought was an interesting read involving all things portraiture: Portraiture by Shearer West. (Might require UoGuelph library log-in)

What Makes A Great Portrait?

More conceptual portraits:
‘Humanae’ Portraits Match People of Different Ethnicities With Their Pantone Color

Fascinating Portraits of Young People Out Clubbing In Rural Spain

Photos of Rural Children Around the World Dressed Up As Their Dream Professions

Disconcerting Portraits of People Wearing Origami Animal Masks

Portraits of Kids From A Deprived Area in the UK

Besides conceptual factors, Chris Levine’s use of light and colour in his photographs as well as in his exhibition were technical factors that were equally as inspiring to me.

If you are interested in portraiture as well and have access to the University of Guelph Library there are also several compelling photography books that I have found to really inspire my thought process. These include “Face: The New Photographic Portrait” by William A. Weing, “At Work” by Anne Leibovitz, “Close Up” by Katharina Sieverding, “Portaits in Series” by Kerber, “Contemporaries: A Photographic Series” by Judith Joy Ross and “Studio Photography: Essential Skills” by John Child for technical matters – all of which could be found in the TR section on the 5th floor of the library.