Thinking About Seeing | Assignment One | What Is Colour?

Seeing vs Perception | AFTERIMAGE

10bggjohns op flag

Painting by Jasper Johns. An example of an after image. Stare at the white dot for 30 seconds (don’t look away), then look at a grey surface, you should see the afterimage.

Examples and discussions of color effect.

9dda78d75471faf85bf8321ff05cd1cf
land_0
Dr. Edwin H. Land.
Photo copyright J.J.Scarpetti.
Image from: The Rowland Institute at Harvard

EDWIN LAND
Video about Edwin Land (the inventor of Polaroid) and his two color process. An article describing the relationship between Edwin Land’s experiments and James Clark Maxwell’s discoveries.

POLAROID NOW: The Impossible Project


CMYK

Short film, creative interpretation of cymk in everyday printing (cereal boxes, etc)

 

FOUNDATIONS of VISION: COLOR
Fantastic resource via Stanford University

 

ALTERED PERCEPTION and VISION
Dr. George Stratton

Dr. George Stratton’s original article,
SOME PRELIMINARY EXPERIMENTS ON VISION WITHOUT INVERSION OF THE RETINAL IMAGE.

Summary and explanation of Stratton’s work, courtesy of the staff of San Francisco’s Museum of Science, Art, and Human Perception.

Newer article, based on Stratton’s research.

Great WIRED article about neuroplasticity, vision, and perception.

Video showing inverted vision experiments: Living in a Reversed World.

THE ILLUSION OF COLOUR CONSTANCY | Color Subjectivity | Living in the past
Video.
Is your red my red? No. It isn’t.

The neurological lag between seeing light and understanding/processing light.

What is video, anyway?

TEST YOUR COLOUR SENSITIVITY (thanks Alison!)
Test from Pantone

 

Seeing Colour, Thinking Colour: Assignment 1

First things first: Can you see colour?

boat

You should be able to see a brown boat in the above image. If you can’t, you might have colour blindness.

THE SCIENCE OF COLOUR AND LIGHT

Optical illusions show how we see.

Color and Physics

Colour and light, explained by Bill Nye (the science guy).

Light Fantastic 4: Light, The Universe, and Everything.

A BBC video that explores, “the research on the strange relationship between light, the eye and mind, and the development of new technologies such as photography and film”

This is an interesting TED talk about Colour Theory.

The History of Color Models
To augment our class discussion about colour, learn about the history of the colour wheel.

History of Color Models
Color Models
Color: Standford University Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Jason Salavon, pushes boundaries between photography/computer science/video etc.  Here is his interpretation of the Colour Wheel.

Color and Subject Interpretation
After listening to the RadioLab podcast, you might be thinking What colour is the sky?

Colour and Language
This video explores the relationship between the development of language and the processing and understanding of colour.

PODCAST LINKS

1. CBC podcast, The Current | Mechanics of the Game Changers

Here is what high-jump looked like before Dick Fosbury. And here, is what the high-jump look like after Dick Fosbury. Further info about the Fosbury Flop technique.

2. This episode of RADIOLAB. Click the LISTEN link at the top and you’ll hear the entire podcast. (1:08ish)

After you listen to Radiolab podcast, watch this. Behold. The Mantis Shrimp!

RESOURCES
Go here. It’s an amazing resource of artists.

OR, HERE TO THIS GREAT web-based component to a larger MOMA exhibition about reinventing color

What about this?

This video explores the relationship between the development of language and the processing and understanding of colour.


Sophie Calle | Chromatic Diet | Explanation about the project

sophiemon5

sophitues1

sophiewed

sophiethurs1

sophiefri

sophiesat

sundaysophie

sophiesunday1

Georges Rousse | artist website | Bending Space documentary about Durham Project | trailer | Bending Space website

georges-rousse_1

georges-rousse_2

georges-rousse_3

JESSICA EATON

cfaal 241 tumblr_mrzqleFFzM1qkdlfoo1_500

Jessica Eaton | Interview in The Believer | Her personal blog | Her professional site (click on galleries to access images) | Interview in Canadian Art | Good list of interviews
Lenscraft:Jessica Eaton Asks Us to Think About What We See

This following text is from various interviews with Eaton, published or referenced from her blog.

“She was aware of the science of light at work even in what she calls “normal” photographs, aware that subject and content buried those phenomena, preventing viewers from seeing what was there. In 2006, her work shifted and she began to bring those hidden elements to the forefront. She isolated light and color and time, even though to do so was to challenge the classical definition of photography as a way to capture a single moment.

“Using a wide array of experimental, analogue-based photographic techniques such as colour separation filters, multiple exposures, dark slides and in-camera masking Jessica Eaton builds images on sheets of 4×5 film that address fundamental properties of photography such as light, chance, duration, illusion and spatial relations.  Eaton has written: “I often set up parameters for phenomena to express itself. In the best of cases I push things so that the response comes in ways that I could not have thought up until I was shown it on film. Once you get to see or experience something you can use it. Then you can use it to see something else.”

A quote from a TIME magazine article:

“Canadian photographer Jessica Eaton uses her camera to create color invisible to the naked eye. She gives bright hues to gray forms in her series Cubes for Albers and LeWitt, and that work was recently awarded the photography prize at the 2012 Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography—a prize for which TIME’s director of photography Kira Pollack sat on the jury.

Jessica Eaton

“We’ve all mixed two colors of paint together, and either it makes another color or, if you keep going, it gets muddy and progressively gets darker,” she explains. “In light, things work really differently.” Eaton explains that she exploits the properties of light through additive color separation: whereas the primary pigment colors (red, blue, yellow) get darker as they blend, the primary colors of light (red, blue, green) move toward white. Eaton applies filters in those three colors to her camera and takes multiple exposures, a process that turns the gray form seen here into the vibrant ones seen above. “The color itself is mixed inside the camera,” she says.

One of the byproducts of Eaton’s process is an element of surprise: because her images are created within the camera, she doesn’t know what she’ll get until the photos are developed. “It’s a bit of a conversation with the world,” she says. “With the forces of time and space and contingency and errors that happen, because often there’s so many steps going into one of these, I get back something that’s also new to me, and those are the pictures that tend to end up in exhibits.”

But the photographer likes challenging definitions, and not just photographic ones. Although she dislikes the term “abstract” as a description of her work—it implies that the light she captures doesn’t exist in reality—Eaton says that her photographs acknowledge “how incredibly limited our ability to perceive the world is.” We lack the sensory mechanisms to see her colors with our naked eyes, and Eaton sees that as a metaphor for our inability to see the extent of the physical universe, whether it includes multiple dimensions or parallel universes. And, in that metaphor, she sees hope. “I love the idea that no matter how bad it gets,” she says, “there’s this wild so-called reality way beyond what we have decided it is.”

Liz Wolfe | Happiness is Contagious

Guy Bourdin | Fashion photography

Yves Klein | TATE Modern | MOMA

ARTISTS
These are some of the artists we discussed in class today. If you want to review the images and you should, you should look and look and look until you just can’t look anymore.

Amazing resource of artists from Tate Liverpool.
Web-based component to a larger MOMA exhibition about reinventing color

These aren’t listed in order
Cynthia Greg
Ed Burtynsky
Jan Groover
Elina Brotherus
Gage and Betterton
Manjari Sharma
Eileen Cowin
Linda Troeller
Olafur Eliasson
Alex Kisilevich
Joel Sternfeld
Amy Stein
Julia Fullerton-Batten
Richard Billingham
Martin Parr
William Eggleston
Stephen Shore
Andres Serrano
Joel Meyerwitz
Andreas Gursky
Sandy Skoglund
Anthony Hernandez

Behold, the glorious mantis shrimp

The Mantis Shrimp.

SEEING MOTION
Expanding on our discussion about perception vs seeing, we can thank Eadweard Muybridge and Harold Edgerton two pioneers of photographic studies of motion.

MuybridgeBuffalo
Muybridge_race_horse_animated

Photo.005 Photo.006

Harold Edgerton

Photo.016

MIT Edgerton Center
We will be seeing more work inspired by and using similar techniques as Edgerton during Assignment Three.

Seeing vs Perception

AFTERIMAGE

10bggjohns op flag

Painting by Jasper Johns. An example of an after image. Stare at the white dot for 30 seconds (don’t look away), then look at a grey surface, you should see the afterimage.

Examples and discussions of color effect.

9dda78d75471faf85bf8321ff05cd1cf

 

EDWIN LAND
Video about Edwin Land (the inventor of Polaroid) and his two color process.

An article describing the relationship between Edwin Land’s experiments and James Clark Maxwell’s discoveries.

CMYK
Short film, creative interpretation of cymk in everyday printing (cereal boxes, etc)

FOUNDATIONS of VISION: COLOR
Fantastic resource via Stanford University

ALTERED PERCEPTION and VISION
Dr. George Stratton

Dr. George Stratton’s original article,
SOME PRELIMINARY EXPERIMENTS ON VISION WITHOUT INVERSION OF THE RETINAL IMAGE.

Summary and explanation of Stratton’s work, courtesy of the staff of San Francisco’s Museum of Science, Art, and Human Perception.

Newer article, based on Stratton’s research.

Great WIRED article about neuroplasticity, vision, and perception.

Video showing inverted vision experiments: Living in a Reversed World.

The illusion of colour constancy | Color Subjectivity | Living in the past
Video.
Is your red my red? No. It isn’t.

The neurological lag between seeing light and understanding/processing light.

What is video, anyway?

 

Assignment One • Resources • Artists

Sophie Calle | Chromatic Diet | Explanation about the project

sophiemon5

sophitues1

sophiewed

sophiethurs1

sophiefri

sophiesat

sundaysophie

sophiesunday1

Georges Rousse | artist website | Bending Space documentary about Durham Project | trailer | Bending Space website

georges-rousse_1

georges-rousse_2

georges-rousse_3

Liz Wolfe | Happiness is Contagious
Guy Bourdin | Fashion photography

For more resources about various artists and colour, see this post, related to Assignment One.

cfaal 241 tumblr_mrzqleFFzM1qkdlfoo1_500

Jessica Eaton | Interview in The Believer | Her personal blog | Her professional site (click on galleries to access images) | Interview in Canadian Art | Good list of interviews

This following text is from various interviews with Eaton, published or referenced from her blog.

“She was aware of the science of light at work even in what she calls “normal” photographs, aware that subject and content buried those phenomena, preventing viewers from seeing what was there. In 2006, her work shifted and she began to bring those hidden elements to the forefront. She isolated light and color and time, even though to do so was to challenge the classical definition of photography as a way to capture a single moment.

“Using a wide array of experimental, analogue-based photographic techniques such as colour separation filters, multiple exposures, dark slides and in-camera masking Jessica Eaton builds images on sheets of 4×5 film that address fundamental properties of photography such as light, chance, duration, illusion and spatial relations.  Eaton has written: “I often set up parameters for phenomena to express itself. In the best of cases I push things so that the response comes in ways that I could not have thought up until I was shown it on film. Once you get to see or experience something you can use it. Then you can use it to see something else.”

A quote from a TIME magazine article:

“Canadian photographer Jessica Eaton uses her camera to create color invisible to the naked eye. She gives bright hues to gray forms in her series Cubes for Albers and LeWitt, and that work was recently awarded the photography prize at the 2012 Hyères International Festival of Fashion and Photography—a prize for which TIME’s director of photography Kira Pollack sat on the jury.

Jessica Eaton

“We’ve all mixed two colors of paint together, and either it makes another color or, if you keep going, it gets muddy and progressively gets darker,” she explains. “In light, things work really differently.” Eaton explains that she exploits the properties of light through additive color separation: whereas the primary pigment colors (red, blue, yellow) get darker as they blend, the primary colors of light (red, blue, green) move toward white. Eaton applies filters in those three colors to her camera and takes multiple exposures, a process that turns the gray form seen here into the vibrant ones seen above. “The color itself is mixed inside the camera,” she says.

One of the byproducts of Eaton’s process is an element of surprise: because her images are created within the camera, she doesn’t know what she’ll get until the photos are developed. “It’s a bit of a conversation with the world,” she says. “With the forces of time and space and contingency and errors that happen, because often there’s so many steps going into one of these, I get back something that’s also new to me, and those are the pictures that tend to end up in exhibits.”

But the photographer likes challenging definitions, and not just photographic ones. Although she dislikes the term “abstract” as a description of her work—it implies that the light she captures doesn’t exist in reality—Eaton says that her photographs acknowledge “how incredibly limited our ability to perceive the world is.” We lack the sensory mechanisms to see her colors with our naked eyes, and Eaton sees that as a metaphor for our inability to see the extent of the physical universe, whether it includes multiple dimensions or parallel universes. And, in that metaphor, she sees hope. “I love the idea that no matter how bad it gets,” she says, “there’s this wild so-called reality way beyond what we have decided it is.”

ARTISTS
These are the artists we discussed in class today. If you want to review the images (and you should, you should look and look and look until you just can’t look anymore) the Powerpoint file is posted on the Courselink.

Amazing resource of artists from Tate Liverpool.
Web-based component to a larger MOMA exhibition about reinventing color

These aren’t listed in order
Cynthia Greg
Ed Burtynsky
Jan Groover
Elina Brotherus
Gage and Betterton
Manjari Sharma
Eileen Cowin
Linda Troeller
Olafur Eliasson
Alex Kisilevich
Joel Sternfeld
Amy Stein
Julia Fullerton-Batten
Richard Billingham
Martin Parr
William Eggleston
Stephen Shore
Andres Serrano
Joel Meyerwitz
Andreas Gursky
Sandy Skoglund
Anthony Hernandez

Reinventing Colour

Go here. It’s an amazing resource of artists.
Or here!
History of Color Models

Color Models
Color: Standford University Encyclopedia of Philosophy

OR, HERE TO THIS GREAT web-based component to a larger MOMA exhibition about reinventing color

What about this?

This video explores the relationship between the development of language and the processing and understanding of colour.

Research | The importance of looking

You’re a photographer. This means you need to look at photography.
This list is by no means exhaustive, but it is a good place to begin. Use the

Museum | Gallery websites
THIS
is a great list of photography-related museums
Saatchi Gallery
Tate Modern
Metropolitan Museum of Art
The British Museum
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Smithsonian Cooper-Hewittt National Design Museum
Smithsonian American Art Museum
Centre Pompidou (Paris)
Guggenheim (Bilbao)
Guggenheim (NY)
MOMA
The J.Paul Getty Museum
MIT open courseware
Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO)
Musee d’Art Contemporain (Montreal)
Wexner Center for the Arts
Museum of Contemporary Art (Chicago)

National Gallery of Canada
Victoria and Albert Museum

International Center of Photography

Magazines | Online Journals
Aperture
Magazine
The F Stop (professional photographers discuss their craft)
Border Crossings
Frieze Magazine
Art Forum
Art Papers
Canadian Art
Feature Shoot
(interviews with contemporary photographers)
Conscientious Extended
St. Lucy

OTIS College on YouTube (excellent resources for artist interviews, lectures, etc)

Scholarly websites
TATE research
Smart History

Journal of Contemporary Art

Art Facts
Images: A Journal of Film and Popular Culture
Arts section of New York Times
Subject and Course guides from The U of G library

PHOTOGRAPHY at the Smithsonian Magazine

Keeping Track of your Research
Delicious
Pinterest
Creating a Google Alert. Tips for getting the results you want

Environmental portraiture

We’ll be looking at some photographers from the Helsinki School. You can go here for more information.

Pekka Turunen’s page at Stephen Bulger gallery.

Veli Grano ( main page) or scroll down to find the Tangible Cosmologies work.

Nikki S. Lee at the Museum of Contemporary Photography

A blog of images from the collection of the International Center of Photography.

Alec Soth, Niagra Project and interview with the Guardian (UK) and his MagnumPhotos page and what it’s like to approach strangers for a living and another video that is good, despite it’s dubious rock introduction. And another one about shooting your own work while on assignment.

BBC documentary on WILLIAM EGGLESTON!

Museum of Contemporary Photography exhibition, The Furtive Gaze

Explanation of Shizuka Yokomizo, Strangers

Rineke Dijkstra, Beach Portraits and MOMA’s collection

Cruel and Tender at the TATE Modern. Excellent video interviews with Stephen Shore, Rineke Dijkstra, Martin Parr and other artists in the show.

Helen van Meene and, an interview with Helen van Meene where she discusses portraiture

Gillian Wearing, TATE Modern and an interview in the Guardian UK

Bill Owens

Lauren Greenfield

Artists: Powerpoint #1

These are the artists from the first Powerpoint. If you want to review the images (and you should, you should look and look and look until you just can’t look anymore) the files are posted on the Courselink.

Cynthia Greg
Ed Burtynsky
Aino Kannisto
Jan Groover
Elina Brotherus
Gage and Betterton
Manjari Sharma
Eileen Cowin
Linda Troeller
Olafur Eliasson
Alex Kisilevich
Joel Sternfeld
Amy Stein
Julia Fullerton-Batten
Richard Billingham
Martin Parr
William Eggleston
Stephen Shore
Andres Serrano
Joel Meyerwitz
Andreas Gursky
Sandy Skoglund
Anthony Hernandez